How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

37 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Research has shown that lighting can have an influence on wellbeing, health and performance. In this study, we explore whether lighting preferences reflect these effects. Results of a longitudinal field study by Begemann and colleagues (1997) revealed that on average, office employees’ preferred a higher illuminance than prescribed by current standards for office environments, which are mainly based on ergonomic needs for visual tasks. In addition, they found that the light preferences varied with time of day – roughly following a natural daylight curve. These individual light preferences are said to also depend on a person’s level of alertness and mood, although this has not been investigated yet. In this study, we explored whether time of day, daylight contribution, alertness and mood have an influence on light preference. We hypothesized that people would prefer more intense light when they felt less alert.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland
EditorsO. Romice, E. Edgerton, K. Thwaites
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Pages73-73
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event22nd Conference of the International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS 22), June 24-29, 2012, Glasgow, Scotland, UK - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 24 Jun 201229 Jun 2012

Conference

Conference22nd Conference of the International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS 22), June 24-29, 2012, Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Abbreviated titleIAPS 22
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period24/06/1229/06/12
Other"Human Experience in the Natural and Built Environment: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice"

Fingerprint

mood
time of day
work environment
ergonomics
employee
human being
time
health
performance

Cite this

Smolders, K. C. H. J., & Kort, de, Y. A. W. (2012). How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood. In O. Romice, E. Edgerton, & K. Thwaites (Eds.), Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland (pp. 73-73). Glasgow: University of Strathclyde.
Smolders, K.C.H.J. ; Kort, de, Y.A.W. / How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood. Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland. editor / O. Romice ; E. Edgerton ; K. Thwaites. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2012. pp. 73-73
@inproceedings{46acfa5ac1774693ae6b799986e7a229,
title = "How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood",
abstract = "Research has shown that lighting can have an influence on wellbeing, health and performance. In this study, we explore whether lighting preferences reflect these effects. Results of a longitudinal field study by Begemann and colleagues (1997) revealed that on average, office employees’ preferred a higher illuminance than prescribed by current standards for office environments, which are mainly based on ergonomic needs for visual tasks. In addition, they found that the light preferences varied with time of day – roughly following a natural daylight curve. These individual light preferences are said to also depend on a person’s level of alertness and mood, although this has not been investigated yet. In this study, we explored whether time of day, daylight contribution, alertness and mood have an influence on light preference. We hypothesized that people would prefer more intense light when they felt less alert.",
author = "K.C.H.J. Smolders and {Kort, de}, Y.A.W.",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
pages = "73--73",
editor = "O. Romice and E. Edgerton and K. Thwaites",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland",
publisher = "University of Strathclyde",

}

Smolders, KCHJ & Kort, de, YAW 2012, How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood. in O Romice, E Edgerton & K Thwaites (eds), Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, pp. 73-73, 22nd Conference of the International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS 22), June 24-29, 2012, Glasgow, Scotland, UK, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 24/06/12.

How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood. / Smolders, K.C.H.J.; Kort, de, Y.A.W.

Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland. ed. / O. Romice; E. Edgerton; K. Thwaites. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2012. p. 73-73.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood

AU - Smolders, K.C.H.J.

AU - Kort, de, Y.A.W.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Research has shown that lighting can have an influence on wellbeing, health and performance. In this study, we explore whether lighting preferences reflect these effects. Results of a longitudinal field study by Begemann and colleagues (1997) revealed that on average, office employees’ preferred a higher illuminance than prescribed by current standards for office environments, which are mainly based on ergonomic needs for visual tasks. In addition, they found that the light preferences varied with time of day – roughly following a natural daylight curve. These individual light preferences are said to also depend on a person’s level of alertness and mood, although this has not been investigated yet. In this study, we explored whether time of day, daylight contribution, alertness and mood have an influence on light preference. We hypothesized that people would prefer more intense light when they felt less alert.

AB - Research has shown that lighting can have an influence on wellbeing, health and performance. In this study, we explore whether lighting preferences reflect these effects. Results of a longitudinal field study by Begemann and colleagues (1997) revealed that on average, office employees’ preferred a higher illuminance than prescribed by current standards for office environments, which are mainly based on ergonomic needs for visual tasks. In addition, they found that the light preferences varied with time of day – roughly following a natural daylight curve. These individual light preferences are said to also depend on a person’s level of alertness and mood, although this has not been investigated yet. In this study, we explored whether time of day, daylight contribution, alertness and mood have an influence on light preference. We hypothesized that people would prefer more intense light when they felt less alert.

M3 - Conference contribution

SP - 73

EP - 73

BT - Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland

A2 - Romice, O.

A2 - Edgerton, E.

A2 - Thwaites, K.

PB - University of Strathclyde

CY - Glasgow

ER -

Smolders KCHJ, Kort, de YAW. How do you like your light in the morning? : preferences for light settings as a function of time, daylight contribution, alertness and mood. In Romice O, Edgerton E, Thwaites K, editors, Proceedings of the 22nd International Association for People-Environment Studies (IAPS) Conference, 24-29 June 2012, Glasgow, Scotland. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde. 2012. p. 73-73