Hair cortisol and work stress: Importance of workload and stress model (JDCS or ERI)

L. van der Meij, N. Gubbels, J. Schaveling, M. Almela, M. van Vugt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs) are a potential physiological indicator of work related stress. However, studies that tested the relationship between HCC and self-reported stress in a work setting show mixed findings. This may be because few studies used worker samples that experience prolonged stress. Therefore, we compared a high workload sample (n = 81) and a normal workload sample (n = 91) and studied whether HCC was related to: (i) high job demands, low control, and low social support (JDCS model), and (ii) high effort, low reward, and high overcommitment (ERI model). Results showed that self-reported stress related to HCC only in the high workload sample and only for the variables of the ERI model. We found that HCC was higher when effort was high, reward low, and overcommitment high. An implication of this study is that a certain stress threshold may need to be reached to detect a relationship between self-reported stress and physiological measures such as HCC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)78-85
Number of pages8
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume89
Issue numberMarch 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Workload
Hair
Hydrocortisone
Reward
Social Support

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • ERI
  • HCC
  • HPA
  • JDCS
  • Self-reported stress

Cite this

van der Meij, L. ; Gubbels, N. ; Schaveling, J. ; Almela, M. ; van Vugt, M. / Hair cortisol and work stress : Importance of workload and stress model (JDCS or ERI). In: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2018 ; Vol. 89, No. March 2018. pp. 78-85.
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Hair cortisol and work stress : Importance of workload and stress model (JDCS or ERI). / van der Meij, L.; Gubbels, N.; Schaveling, J.; Almela, M.; van Vugt, M.

In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, Vol. 89, No. March 2018, 01.03.2018, p. 78-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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