From the freezer to the clinic: Antifreeze proteins in the preservation of cells, tissues, and organs

Roderick P. Tas, Vasco Sampaio-Pinto, Tom Wennekes, Linda W. van Laake (Corresponding author), Ilja K. Voets (Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms by which natural anti-freeze proteins protect cells and tissues from cold could help to improve the availability of donor organs for transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere52162
Number of pages7
JournalEMBO Reports
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2021

Funding

We apologize that we were unable to cite and discuss all relevant papers due to space limitations. This work was financially supported by the European Union (ERC-2014-StG Contract No. 635928), the Dutch Science Foundation (NWO ECHO Grant No. 712.016.002), the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science (Gravity Program 024.001.035), the Netherlands Heart Foundation (Dekker Senior Clinical Scientist 2019 Grant No. 2019T056) and the alliance between Eindhoven University of Technology, Utrecht University and the University Medical Center Utrecht.

FundersFunder number
ERC-2014-StG
Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht
European Commission635928
Universiteit Utrecht
Hartstichting, Nederlandse2019T056
Eindhoven University of Technology
Ministerie van Onderwijs, Cultuur en Wetenschap024.001.035
Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek712.016.002

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