From competition and collusion to consent-based collaboration: a case study of local democracy

A.G.L. Romme, J. Broekgaarden, C. Huijzer, A. Reijmer, R.A.I. van der Eyden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
127 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The high distrust in political institutions and a growing sense of powerlessness among many citizens suggest that prevailing democratic governance systems lack a capability for collective dialogue and learning. The key thesis here is that public governance systems can benefit from organizational arrangements informed by circular design. A case study conducted at a Dutch municipality illustrates how principles of circular design served to enhance the city council’s role of orchestrator of civil participation. This case also illustrates how a local democracy, which has long suffered from majority–minority ploys and voting schemes, can be transformed into a consent-based culture of collaboration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-255
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Public Administration
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • consent
  • informed consent
  • circularity
  • local democracy
  • public administration
  • organization design
  • collaborative culture
  • majority vote
  • civil participation
  • public governance
  • political institutions
  • Political trust
  • circular design

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'From competition and collusion to consent-based collaboration: a case study of local democracy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this