From competition and collusion to consent-based collaboration: a case study of local democracy

A.G.L. Romme, J. Broekgaarden, C. Huijzer, A. Reijmer, R.A.I. van der Eyden

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Abstract

The high distrust in political institutions and a growing sense of powerlessness among many citizens suggest that prevailing democratic governance systems lack a capability for collective dialogue and learning. The key thesis here is that public governance systems can benefit from organizational arrangements informed by circular design. A case study conducted at a Dutch municipality illustrates how principles of circular design served to enhance the city council’s role of orchestrator of civil participation. This case also illustrates how a local democracy, that has long suffered from majority–minority ploys and voting schemes, can be transformed into a consent-based culture of collaboration.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-255
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Public Administration
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

governance
democracy
municipal council
political institution
voting
municipality
dialogue
citizen
participation
lack
learning
Democracy
Consent
Collusion
Governance
Participation
Public governance
Distrust
Political institutions
Municipalities

Keywords

  • consent
  • informed consent
  • circularity
  • local democracy
  • public administration
  • organization design
  • collaborative culture
  • majority vote
  • civil participation
  • public governance
  • political institutions

Cite this

Romme, A.G.L. ; Broekgaarden, J. ; Huijzer, C. ; Reijmer, A. ; van der Eyden, R.A.I. / From competition and collusion to consent-based collaboration: a case study of local democracy. In: International Journal of Public Administration. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 3. pp. 246-255.
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From competition and collusion to consent-based collaboration: a case study of local democracy. / Romme, A.G.L.; Broekgaarden, J.; Huijzer, C.; Reijmer, A.; van der Eyden, R.A.I.

In: International Journal of Public Administration, Vol. 41, No. 3, 05.01.2018, p. 246-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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