Filler size effects on the conductivity of polymer nanocomposites: semiconductive phthalocyanine nanoparticles in epoxy matrices

M. Yuan, J.C.M. Brokken-Zijp, L.J. Huijbregts, G. With, de

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three Cobalt(III) phthalocyanine (Phthalcon) powders with different particle sizes and chemical compositions, but almost equal XRD spectra and powder conductivity were synthesized and used as conductive fillers in crosslinked epoxy matrices. Two of these Phthalcons are new compounds. The relation between the conductivity of the composites and the type and amount of filler used was determined. The influence of particle size and chemical composition on this relation appeared to be minimal. These composites had a percolation threshold of 0.9 vol % and a maximum volume conductivity of 10-7 S/cm. Detailed analysis showed that the particle networks have very similar fractal structures and that they are likely to be formed by diffusion limited cluster-cluster aggregation during processing. Evidence is presented that these particle networks are formed at an early stage of crosslinking and that the charge transfer between particles in the networks is neither limited by the Phthalcon particle size, nor by the presence of polymer matrix between the particles. The maximum volume conductivity of these composites is likely to be limited by the amount of filler used, the crystal structure defects on the particle surface, and the fractality and the imperfection of the particle networks. The impact of these findings on the conductivity of other polymer nanocomposites is discussed. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys 46: 1079-1093, 2008
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1079-1093
JournalJournal of Polymer Science, Part B: Polymer Physics
Volume46
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Filler size effects on the conductivity of polymer nanocomposites: semiconductive phthalocyanine nanoparticles in epoxy matrices'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this