Fermented dairy products consumption is associated with attenuated cortical bone loss independently of total calcium, protein, and energy intakes in healthy postmenopausal women

E. Biver, C. Durosier-Izart, F. Merminod, T. Chevalley, B. van Rietbergen, S.L. Ferrari, R. Rizzoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A longitudinal analysis of bone microstructure in postmenopausal women of the Geneva Retirees Cohort indicates that age-related cortical bone loss is attenuated at non-bearing bone sites in fermented dairy products consumers, not in milk or ripened cheese consumers, independently of total energy, calcium, or protein intakes.

INTRODUCTION: Fermented dairy products (FDP), including yogurts, provide calcium, phosphorus, and proteins together with prebiotics and probiotics, all being potentially beneficial for bone. In this prospective cohort study, we investigated whether FDP, milk, or ripened cheese consumptions influence age-related changes of bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure.

METHODS: Dietary intakes were assessed at baseline and after 3.0 ± 0.5 years with a food frequency questionnaire in 482 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Geneva Retirees Cohort. Cortical (Ct) and trabecular (Tb) volumetric (v) BMD and microstructure at the distal radius and tibia were assessed by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computerized tomography, in addition to areal (a) BMD and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, at the same time points.

RESULTS: At baseline, FDP consumers had lower abdominal fat mass and larger bone size at the radius and tibia. Parathyroid hormone and β-carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen levels were inversely correlated with FDP consumption. In the longitudinal analysis, FDP consumption (mean of the two assessments) was associated with attenuated loss of radius total vBMD and of Ct vBMD, area, and thickness. There was no difference in aBMD and at the tibia. These associations were independent of total energy, calcium, or protein intakes. For other dairy products categories, only milk consumption was associated with lower decrease of aBMD and of failure load at the radius.

CONCLUSION: In this prospective cohort of healthy postmenopausal women, age-related Ct bone loss was attenuated at non-bearing bone sites in FDP consumers, not in milk or ripened cheese consumers, independently of total energy, calcium, or protein intakes.

STUDY REGISTRATION: ISRCTN11865958 ( http://www.isrctn.com ).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1771–1782
Number of pages12
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number8
Early online date3 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Bone fragility
  • Bone microstructure
  • Bone mineral density
  • Nutrition
  • Osteoporosis
  • Yogurts
  • Cultured Milk Products/statistics & numerical data
  • Absorptiometry, Photon/methods
  • Postmenopause/physiology
  • Calcium, Dietary/administration & dosage
  • Humans
  • Body Composition/drug effects
  • Diet/statistics & numerical data
  • Osteoporosis/epidemiology
  • Energy Intake/physiology
  • Bone Density/drug effects
  • Biomarkers/blood
  • Female
  • Aged
  • Bone Remodeling/drug effects
  • Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage
  • Switzerland/epidemiology
  • Feeding Behavior/physiology

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