Examining temporal effects of lifecycle events on transport mode choice decisions

M. Verhoeven, T.A. Arentze, H.J.P. Timmermans, P.J.H.J. Waerden, van der

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Abstract

This paper describes the first results of a study on the impact of events on transport mode choice decisions. An Internet-based survey was designed to collect data concerning seven structural lifecycle events. In addition, respondents answered questions about personal and household characteristics, possession and availability of transport modes and their current travel behaviour. In total, 710 respondents completed the online survey. The complexity of transport mode choice is modelled using a Bayesian Decision Network. This paper only focuses on the time influence of events on transport mode choice decisions. We assume that people change or at least reconsider their behaviour after a structural, lifecycle event, sometimes directly after experiencing a change and sometimes only after a while. We estimated a multinomial choice model to estimate the effect of these structural events, and in particular of the length of the time elapsed, on transport mode choice.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of CUPUM 05, Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management, London
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherUniversity College London
Number of pages15
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event9th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management (CUPUM 2005), June 29-July 1, 2005, London, UK - CUPUM 2005, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 29 Jun 20051 Jul 2005

Conference

Conference9th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management (CUPUM 2005), June 29-July 1, 2005, London, UK
Abbreviated titleCUPUM 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period29/06/051/07/05

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