Epicardial stenosis severity does not affect minimal microcirculatory resistance

W.H. Aarnoudse, W.F. Fearon, G. Manoharan, M.C.F. Geven, F.N. Vosse, van de, M.C.M. Rutten, B. Bruyne, de, N.H.J. Pijls

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Whether minimal microvascular resistance of the myocardium is affected by the presence of an epicardial stenosis is controversial. Recently, an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was developed that is based on combined measurements of distal coronary pressure and thermodilution-derived mean transit time. In normal coronary arteries, IMR orrelates well with true microvascular resistance. However, to be applicable in the case of an epicardial stenosis, IMR should account for collateral flow. We investigated the feasibility of determining IMR in humans and tested the hypothesis that microvascular resistance is independent of epicardial stenosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were studied. The stenosis was stented with a pressure guidewire, and coronary wedge pressure (P(w) ) was measured during balloon occlusion. After successful stenting, a short compliant balloon with a diameter 1.0 mm smaller than the stent was placed in the stented segment and inflated with increasing pressures, creating a 10%, 50%, and 75% area stenosis. At each of the 3 degrees of stenosis, fractional flow reserve (FFR) and IMR were measured at steady-state maximum hyperemia induced by intravenous adenosine. A total of 90 measurements were performed in 30 patients. When uncorrected for P(w), an apparent increase in microvascular resistance was observed with increasing stenosis severity (IMR=24, 27, and 37 U for the 3 different degrees of stenosis; P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2137-2142
JournalCirculation
Volume110
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Pathologic Constriction
Pressure
Balloon Occlusion
Thermodilution
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Hyperemia
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Adenosine
Stents
Coronary Vessels
Myocardium

Cite this

Aarnoudse, W.H. ; Fearon, W.F. ; Manoharan, G. ; Geven, M.C.F. ; Vosse, van de, F.N. ; Rutten, M.C.M. ; Bruyne, de, B. ; Pijls, N.H.J. / Epicardial stenosis severity does not affect minimal microcirculatory resistance. In: Circulation. 2004 ; Vol. 110, No. 15. pp. 2137-2142.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Whether minimal microvascular resistance of the myocardium is affected by the presence of an epicardial stenosis is controversial. Recently, an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was developed that is based on combined measurements of distal coronary pressure and thermodilution-derived mean transit time. In normal coronary arteries, IMR orrelates well with true microvascular resistance. However, to be applicable in the case of an epicardial stenosis, IMR should account for collateral flow. We investigated the feasibility of determining IMR in humans and tested the hypothesis that microvascular resistance is independent of epicardial stenosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were studied. The stenosis was stented with a pressure guidewire, and coronary wedge pressure (P(w) ) was measured during balloon occlusion. After successful stenting, a short compliant balloon with a diameter 1.0 mm smaller than the stent was placed in the stented segment and inflated with increasing pressures, creating a 10{\%}, 50{\%}, and 75{\%} area stenosis. At each of the 3 degrees of stenosis, fractional flow reserve (FFR) and IMR were measured at steady-state maximum hyperemia induced by intravenous adenosine. A total of 90 measurements were performed in 30 patients. When uncorrected for P(w), an apparent increase in microvascular resistance was observed with increasing stenosis severity (IMR=24, 27, and 37 U for the 3 different degrees of stenosis; P",
author = "W.H. Aarnoudse and W.F. Fearon and G. Manoharan and M.C.F. Geven and {Vosse, van de}, F.N. and M.C.M. Rutten and {Bruyne, de}, B. and N.H.J. Pijls",
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Epicardial stenosis severity does not affect minimal microcirculatory resistance. / Aarnoudse, W.H.; Fearon, W.F.; Manoharan, G.; Geven, M.C.F.; Vosse, van de, F.N.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Bruyne, de, B.; Pijls, N.H.J.

In: Circulation, Vol. 110, No. 15, 2004, p. 2137-2142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Epicardial stenosis severity does not affect minimal microcirculatory resistance

AU - Aarnoudse, W.H.

AU - Fearon, W.F.

AU - Manoharan, G.

AU - Geven, M.C.F.

AU - Vosse, van de, F.N.

AU - Rutten, M.C.M.

AU - Bruyne, de, B.

AU - Pijls, N.H.J.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - BACKGROUND: Whether minimal microvascular resistance of the myocardium is affected by the presence of an epicardial stenosis is controversial. Recently, an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was developed that is based on combined measurements of distal coronary pressure and thermodilution-derived mean transit time. In normal coronary arteries, IMR orrelates well with true microvascular resistance. However, to be applicable in the case of an epicardial stenosis, IMR should account for collateral flow. We investigated the feasibility of determining IMR in humans and tested the hypothesis that microvascular resistance is independent of epicardial stenosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were studied. The stenosis was stented with a pressure guidewire, and coronary wedge pressure (P(w) ) was measured during balloon occlusion. After successful stenting, a short compliant balloon with a diameter 1.0 mm smaller than the stent was placed in the stented segment and inflated with increasing pressures, creating a 10%, 50%, and 75% area stenosis. At each of the 3 degrees of stenosis, fractional flow reserve (FFR) and IMR were measured at steady-state maximum hyperemia induced by intravenous adenosine. A total of 90 measurements were performed in 30 patients. When uncorrected for P(w), an apparent increase in microvascular resistance was observed with increasing stenosis severity (IMR=24, 27, and 37 U for the 3 different degrees of stenosis; P

AB - BACKGROUND: Whether minimal microvascular resistance of the myocardium is affected by the presence of an epicardial stenosis is controversial. Recently, an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was developed that is based on combined measurements of distal coronary pressure and thermodilution-derived mean transit time. In normal coronary arteries, IMR orrelates well with true microvascular resistance. However, to be applicable in the case of an epicardial stenosis, IMR should account for collateral flow. We investigated the feasibility of determining IMR in humans and tested the hypothesis that microvascular resistance is independent of epicardial stenosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirty patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were studied. The stenosis was stented with a pressure guidewire, and coronary wedge pressure (P(w) ) was measured during balloon occlusion. After successful stenting, a short compliant balloon with a diameter 1.0 mm smaller than the stent was placed in the stented segment and inflated with increasing pressures, creating a 10%, 50%, and 75% area stenosis. At each of the 3 degrees of stenosis, fractional flow reserve (FFR) and IMR were measured at steady-state maximum hyperemia induced by intravenous adenosine. A total of 90 measurements were performed in 30 patients. When uncorrected for P(w), an apparent increase in microvascular resistance was observed with increasing stenosis severity (IMR=24, 27, and 37 U for the 3 different degrees of stenosis; P

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DO - 10.1161/01.CIR.0000143893.18451.0E

M3 - Article

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VL - 110

SP - 2137

EP - 2142

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

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