Emission control from stationary sources

F.J.J.G. Janssen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In this chapter the removal of NO and is NB3 emphasised. In tbe troposphere NO contributes to smog formation and acid deposition. Stratospheric ozone depletion is catalysed by NO in the stratosphere. The application of catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 is highlighted. The technology for catalytic NO removal from exhausts of stationary sources is now in a mature state, whereas the removal of ammonia is still in its infancy. Stationary sources are industrial boilers, power plants, waste and biomass incinerators, engines and gas turbines. Issues such as the catalyst types, tbe behaviour of these catalysts in power plants, the mechanism of NO and ammonia over the catalysts are discussed. Ammonia removal from biomass gasification is also reviewed in this chapter.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnvironmental catalysis
EditorsF.J.J.G. Janssen, R.A. Santen, van
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherImperial College Press
Pages293-323
ISBN (Print)1-86094-125-7
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Publication series

NameCatalytic Science Series
Volume1

Fingerprint

emission control
catalyst
ammonia
power plant
smog
acid deposition
stratosphere
troposphere
engine
removal
biomass

Cite this

Janssen, F. J. J. G. (1999). Emission control from stationary sources. In F. J. J. G. Janssen, & R. A. Santen, van (Eds.), Environmental catalysis (pp. 293-323). (Catalytic Science Series; Vol. 1). London: Imperial College Press.
Janssen, F.J.J.G. / Emission control from stationary sources. Environmental catalysis. editor / F.J.J.G. Janssen ; R.A. Santen, van. London : Imperial College Press, 1999. pp. 293-323 (Catalytic Science Series).
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Janssen, FJJG 1999, Emission control from stationary sources. in FJJG Janssen & RA Santen, van (eds), Environmental catalysis. Catalytic Science Series, vol. 1, Imperial College Press, London, pp. 293-323.

Emission control from stationary sources. / Janssen, F.J.J.G.

Environmental catalysis. ed. / F.J.J.G. Janssen; R.A. Santen, van. London : Imperial College Press, 1999. p. 293-323 (Catalytic Science Series; Vol. 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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Janssen FJJG. Emission control from stationary sources. In Janssen FJJG, Santen, van RA, editors, Environmental catalysis. London: Imperial College Press. 1999. p. 293-323. (Catalytic Science Series).