Dynamic phase transitions and time dependent structuring effects in particle-stabilized emulsions

S.C.J. Frijters, F.S. Günther, J.D.R. Harting

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Particle-stabilized emulsions are commonly used in various industrial applications, but their fundamental properties remain poorly understood. Computer simulations are well-suited to probe properties of emulsions that are hard to access experimentally. We use the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method with some extensions to simulate multiple fluids and the suspended particles. We review two examples of our recent research on particle-stabilized emulsions. First, we showcase the possibility of changing an emulsion from a Pickering emulsion to a so-called bijel or vice versa, by changing in time the wettability of the particles. When Pickering emulsions are generated, the droplet size distribution is possibly bimodal, which can be observed in our simulations. Second, we demonstrate the effect of anisotropy of the ellipsoidal particles on the formation of an emulsion. Compared to emulsions stabilized by spherical particles, additional timescales are observed, owing to the extra degrees of freedom introduced by the difference in length of the different axes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationNIC Symposium 2014 : 12-13 February 2014, Julich, Germany
    EditorsK. Binder, G. Münster, M. Kremer
    PublisherForschungszentrum Jülich
    Pages279-286
    ISBN (Print)978-3-89336-933-1
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    Eventconference; NIC symposium 2014; 2014-02-12; 2014-02-12 -
    Duration: 12 Feb 201412 Feb 2014

    Publication series

    NameNIC Series
    Volume47

    Conference

    Conferenceconference; NIC symposium 2014; 2014-02-12; 2014-02-12
    Period12/02/1412/02/14
    OtherNIC symposium 2014

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