Development of the prop chart, a new visual model to evaluate the effectiveness of training with computerised manikins

A.F. Fransen, S.G. Oei

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

High-fidelity manikins and new computerised simulation methods play a key role in medical training. Despite the on-going developments in computer technologies and widespread use of computerised simulation methods, the most effective use of these technologies in medical training is still ambiguous. To give insight into the effectiveness of medical simulation training of health care professionals and to design more effective trainings, we created the Prop chart. This chart is initially developed for the training of multi professional teams using medical simulation. A literature search for evidence based features of effective medical simulation was combined with the opinion of experts in focus group discussions. Ten features of medical simulation that contribute to effective learning were identified and were used in the Prop chart. The experts agreed on the convenience of the Prop chart to evaluate and design medical simulation training programs. Future research will focus on the applicability of the Prop chart for fields outside the medical world and other new training methods like serious gaming.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCSEDU 2012 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer Supported Education
Pages287-290
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 2012
Event4th International Conference on Computer Supported Education, CSEDU 2012 - Porto, Portugal
Duration: 16 Apr 201218 Apr 2012

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Computer Supported Education, CSEDU 2012
CountryPortugal
CityPorto
Period16/04/1218/04/12

Keywords

  • Computerised manikins
  • Education
  • Medical simulation
  • Training

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