Development of a diagnostic glove for unobtrusive measurement of chest compression force and depth during neonatal CPR

K. Dellimore, S. Heunis, F. Gohier, E. Archer, A. de Villiers, J. Smith, C. Scheffer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optimizing chest compression (CC) performance during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is critical to improving survival outcomes since current clinical protocols often achieve only a fraction of the native cardiovascular perfusion. This study presents the development of a diagnostic tool to unobtrusively measure the CC depth and force during neonatal CPR using sensors mounted on a glove platform. The performance of the glove was evaluated by infant manikin tests using the two-thumb (TT) and two-finger (TF) methods of CC during simulated, unventilated neonatal CPR. The TT method yielded maximum CC depths and forces of as much as 25.7 ± 3.2 mm and 35.9 ± 2.2 N while the TF method produced CC depths and forces of as much as 21.6 ± 2.2 mm and 23.7 ± 2.9 N. These results are consistent with clinical findings which suggest that TT compression is more effective than TF compression since it produces greater CC depths and forces.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Pages350-353
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes
Event35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2013) - Osaka, Japan
Duration: 3 Jul 20137 Jul 2013
Conference number: 35

Conference

Conference35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2013)
Abbreviated titleEMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period3/07/137/07/13

Keywords

  • Calibration
  • Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
  • Clothing
  • Equipment Design
  • Fingers
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Manikins
  • Pressure
  • Stress, Mechanical
  • Thorax
  • Thumb
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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