Developing CORBA-based distributed control and building performance environments by run-time coupling

A. Yahiaoui, J.L.M. Hensen, L.L. Soethout

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Communication software and distributed applications for control and building performance simulation software must be reliable, efficient, flexible, and reusable. This paper reports on progress of a project, which aims to achieve better integrated building and systems control modeling in building performance simulation by run-time coupling of distributed computer programs. These requirements motivate the use of the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), which offers sufficient advantage than communication within simple abstraction. However, set up highly available applications with CORBA is hard. Neither control modeling software nor building performance environments have simple interface with CORBA objects. Therefore, this paper describes an architectural solution to distributed control and building performance software tools with CORBA objects. Then, it explains how much the developement of CORBA based distributed building control simulation applications is difficult. The paper finishes by giving some recommendations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering
EditorsK. Beucke, B. Firmenich, D. Donalth, R. Fruchter, K. Roddis
Place of PublicationWeimar
PublisherVDG Weimar
Pages86-93
ISBN (Print)3-86068-213-X
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event10th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering (ICCCBE 2004) - Weimar, Germany
Duration: 2 Jun 20044 Jun 2004
Conference number: 10

Conference

Conference10th International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering (ICCCBE 2004)
Abbreviated titleICCCBE 2004
CountryGermany
CityWeimar
Period2/06/044/06/04

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