Determinants of adaptive behavior among older persons : self-efficacy, importance, and personal dispositions as directive mechanisms

Y.A.W. Slangen-de Kort, C.J.H. Midden, H.A.G. Aarts, A.F.G.M. Wagenberg, van

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25 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Successful aging calls for effective adaptation, which in turn implies flexible use of coping strategies to optimize personal functioning and well-being. The present paper studied adaptive choice behavior of older, independently living persons faced with complications in their houses. The goal was to gain insight into the concrete coping process and its outcome-in terms of the choice of assimilative vs. accommodative strategies-and in the role of three determinants on this process. The determinants were perceived self-efficacy, importance of the problem, and personal dispositions (flexibility and tenacity). A sample of 199 independently-living older persons participated in an experiment that was based on a scenario and questionnaire method, with problems stemming from the domain of independent living. Results mainly underlie the crucial role of perceived self-efficacy and are discussed in view of the concept of successful aging.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-274
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal for Aging and Human Development
Volume53
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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