Detecting regime transitions in slurry bubble columns using pressure time series

K.C. Ruthiya, V.P. Chilekar, M.J.F. Warnier, J. Schaaf, van der, J.R. Ommen, van, B.F.M. Kuster, J.C. Schouten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in the coherent standard deviation and in the average frequency of measured pressure time series with gas velocity, are proposed, as unique and unambiguous criteria to mark flow regime transitions in slurry bubble columns. In a 2-dimensional (2-D) slurry bubble column, pressure time series are measured at different gas velocities simultaneously with high-speed video recording of the gas-liquid flow. The frequency of occurrence and the average diameter of the large bubbles are determined from video image analysis. The gas velocity where the first large bubbles are detected, with an average diameter of 1.5 cm, and with a frequency of occurrence of one bubble per s, is designated as the first regime transition point (transition from the homogeneous regime to the transition regime). At this point, the coherent standard deviation of the measured pressure fluctuations clearly increases from zero. The gas velocity where the average diameter and the frequency of occurrence of the large bubbles become constant, is designated as the second regime transition point (transition from the transition regime to the heterogeneous regime). From this point onward, the slope of the coherent standard deviation of the measured pressure fluctuations clearly decreases with gas velocity, while the average frequency becomes constant. These clear changes with gas velocity in the coherent standard deviation, and in the average frequency are also demonstrated in a 3-D slurry bubble column. © 2005 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2005
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1951-1965
JournalAIChE Journal
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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