Deactivation of silica surfaces with a silanol-terminated polysiloxane; Structural characterization by inverse gas chromatography and solid-state NMR

A.B. Scholten, J.W. Haan, de, J.G.M. Janssen, L.J.M. Ven, van de, C.A.M.G. Cramers

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Abstract

Retention gape deactivated with Silicone OV-1701-OH show good chromatographic performance and remarkable stability against water induced stationary phase degradrdation. In an attempt to better understand the findamentals off the deactivation process using silanol terminated polysiloxanes, a fumed silica was deactivated with Silicon OV-1701-OH. In contrast to fused silic capillaries, fumed silica (Aerosil A-200) can be studied by 29Si cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR, thus serving as a model substrate for fused silica. Retention data from inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilurion and 29Si CP MAS NMR data of five Aerosil phases, differing in residual silanol surface concentration, are correlated with the aim of validating this approach for stationary phase characterization. A comparatively detailed model of the deactivating polymer layer that explains the observed absorption activities is deduced. Surface silanols are shown to play a key role in the polymer layer, the structure of which is of primary importance for the absorption behavior after deactivation. Contrary to common belief, the absolute silanol surface concentration after deativation is only of secondary importance for the overall absorption activity. High silanol surface concentrations enhance degradation of the polysiloxane chains into small cyclic fragments as well as subsequent absorption and immobolization to the silica substrate surface. The mobility of linear polysiloxane chains in the kHz regime (as determined bby NMR cross-polarization dynamics) appears to determine the extent which the residual silanols are accessible for analytes. It is therefore anticipated that there is an optimum silanol surface concentration of fused silica surfaces to be deactivated with silanol terminated polysiloxanes; it should be lazrge enough to adsord polymer fragments, but not large to avoid excessive residual silanol activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-24
JournalJournal of High Resolution Chromatography
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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