Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherAcademic

Abstract

By near threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled and trapped atomic gas we create dense, picosecond electron bunches at electron temperatures three orders of magnitude lower than in conventional field and photoemission sources. The superior coherence properties of this ultracold source will enable single-shot electron diffraction of macromolecules and ultrafast nanodiffraction. Recently we have recorded the first diffraction patterns of graphite using the ultracold source. To control and manipulate highly coherent, ultrashort pulsed beams we are developing compact 3 GHz microwave cavities as versatile time-dependent electron optical elements. We have demonstrated bunch compression – longitudinal focusing – to below 100 fs using a 3 GHz microwave cavity in TM010 mode. Alternatively, a cavity in TM010 mode may be used to lower the energy spread of an electron bunch by longitudinal defocusing. We use microwave cavities in TM110 mode for measuring bunch lengths, but also to chop the continuous beam of an electron microscope into a high repetition rate train of femtosecond single-electron pulses while conserving emittance.

Conference

Conference2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA
CountryUnited States
CityStanford, CA
Period15/09/1417/09/14

Fingerprint

cavities
microwaves
electrons
monatomic gases
defocusing
emittance
macromolecules
shot
photoionization
repetition
photoelectric emission
diffraction patterns
electron diffraction
graphite
electron microscopes
electron energy
thresholds
pulses
lasers
energy

Cite this

Luiten, O. J. (2014). Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging. 2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA, Stanford, CA, United States.
Luiten, O.J./ Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging. 2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA, Stanford, CA, United States.49 p.
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title = "Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging",
abstract = "By near threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled and trapped atomic gas we create dense, picosecond electron bunches at electron temperatures three orders of magnitude lower than in conventional field and photoemission sources. The superior coherence properties of this ultracold source will enable single-shot electron diffraction of macromolecules and ultrafast nanodiffraction. Recently we have recorded the first diffraction patterns of graphite using the ultracold source. To control and manipulate highly coherent, ultrashort pulsed beams we are developing compact 3 GHz microwave cavities as versatile time-dependent electron optical elements. We have demonstrated bunch compression – longitudinal focusing – to below 100 fs using a 3 GHz microwave cavity in TM010 mode. Alternatively, a cavity in TM010 mode may be used to lower the energy spread of an electron bunch by longitudinal defocusing. We use microwave cavities in TM110 mode for measuring bunch lengths, but also to chop the continuous beam of an electron microscope into a high repetition rate train of femtosecond single-electron pulses while conserving emittance.",
author = "O.J. Luiten",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
note = "2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA ; Conference date: 15-09-2014 Through 17-09-2014",

}

Luiten, OJ 2014, 'Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging' 2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA, Stanford, CA, United States, 15/09/14 - 17/09/14, .

Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging. / Luiten, O.J.

2014. 2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA, Stanford, CA, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging

AU - Luiten,O.J.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - By near threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled and trapped atomic gas we create dense, picosecond electron bunches at electron temperatures three orders of magnitude lower than in conventional field and photoemission sources. The superior coherence properties of this ultracold source will enable single-shot electron diffraction of macromolecules and ultrafast nanodiffraction. Recently we have recorded the first diffraction patterns of graphite using the ultracold source. To control and manipulate highly coherent, ultrashort pulsed beams we are developing compact 3 GHz microwave cavities as versatile time-dependent electron optical elements. We have demonstrated bunch compression – longitudinal focusing – to below 100 fs using a 3 GHz microwave cavity in TM010 mode. Alternatively, a cavity in TM010 mode may be used to lower the energy spread of an electron bunch by longitudinal defocusing. We use microwave cavities in TM110 mode for measuring bunch lengths, but also to chop the continuous beam of an electron microscope into a high repetition rate train of femtosecond single-electron pulses while conserving emittance.

AB - By near threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled and trapped atomic gas we create dense, picosecond electron bunches at electron temperatures three orders of magnitude lower than in conventional field and photoemission sources. The superior coherence properties of this ultracold source will enable single-shot electron diffraction of macromolecules and ultrafast nanodiffraction. Recently we have recorded the first diffraction patterns of graphite using the ultracold source. To control and manipulate highly coherent, ultrashort pulsed beams we are developing compact 3 GHz microwave cavities as versatile time-dependent electron optical elements. We have demonstrated bunch compression – longitudinal focusing – to below 100 fs using a 3 GHz microwave cavity in TM010 mode. Alternatively, a cavity in TM010 mode may be used to lower the energy spread of an electron bunch by longitudinal defocusing. We use microwave cavities in TM110 mode for measuring bunch lengths, but also to chop the continuous beam of an electron microscope into a high repetition rate train of femtosecond single-electron pulses while conserving emittance.

M3 - Other

ER -

Luiten OJ. Cool beams for ultrafast electron imaging. 2014. 2014 Annual Symposium Stanford Photonics Research Center, September 15-17, 2014, Stanford, CA, USA, Stanford, CA, United States.