Component-wise Supervisory Controller Synthesis in a Client/Server Architecture

Robin Loose, Bram van der Sanden, Michel Reniers, Ramon Schiffelers

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The manual design of monolithic controllers for flexible manufacturing systems is no longer feasible due to the sheer size of the problem. A well-known approach to tackle this scalability problem is to create a set of smaller controllers and orchestrate their interaction in an architecture. Another approach is to use synthesis techniques to generate a controller model from models of the uncontrolled system and the formalized requirements. In this paper we describe a pragmatic approach that combines the complementary advantages of these two approaches, where we decompose the design problem of the controller into a number of sub-controllers by introducing intermediate interfaces and use supervisory controller synthesis to synthesize the sub-controllers. We have evaluated this approach on an industrial case study, where we examined a large controller in a lithography machine. We found that the approach can successfully be used to generate a large portion of the needed sub-controllers.

LanguageEnglish
Pages381-387
Number of pages7
JournalIFAC-PapersOnLine
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Servers
Controllers
Flexible manufacturing systems
Lithography
Scalability

Keywords

  • Discrete Event Systems
  • Extended Finite-State Machines
  • Formal Methods
  • Supervisory Control
  • Synthesis

Cite this

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Component-wise Supervisory Controller Synthesis in a Client/Server Architecture. / Loose, Robin; Sanden, Bram van der; Reniers, Michel; Schiffelers, Ramon.

In: IFAC-PapersOnLine, Vol. 51, No. 7, 01.01.2018, p. 381-387.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleAcademicpeer-review

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