Attenuation effects on laser-based nitric oxide diagnostics in a heavy-duty diesel engine

K. Verbiezen, R. J.H. Klein-Douwel, A. J. Donkerbroek, A. P. Van Vliet, W. L. Meerts, N. J. Dam, J. J. Ter Meulen

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

    Abstract

    A number of laser diagnostic techniques enabling a correction for laser intensity and detection efficiency of the raw NO-LIF data is presented. Laser beam transmission measurements at 226 nm, with the laser beam parallel to the cylinder axis, show that ∼ 20° aTDC the transmission is typically 1%; it increases to 50-80% later in the stroke, depending on engine load. Since absorption by CO2 shows a strong wavelength dependence (increasing absorption for shorter wavelengths), the attenuation for 237 nm being equal to that for 226 nm suggests that CO2 does not play a dominant role in the laser beam transmission. Since the overall laser beam transmission measurements show considerable attenuation, the bidirectional results suggest that most of the laser beam extinction occurs outside the field of view, e.g. in the piston bowl. Not only the laser beam, but also NO fluorescence is attenuated. Detection of NO LIF through a spectrograph allows quantitative comparison of the intensities of the observed fluorescence bands at 237, 248, and 259 nm. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 30th International Symposium on Combustion (Chicago, IL 7/25-30/2004).

    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004
    Event30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations - Chicago, IL, United States
    Duration: 25 Jul 200430 Jul 2004

    Conference

    Conference30th International Symposium on Combustion, Abstracts of Works-in-Progress Poster Presentations
    CountryUnited States
    CityChicago, IL
    Period25/07/0430/07/04

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Attenuation effects on laser-based nitric oxide diagnostics in a heavy-duty diesel engine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this