Attack, disapproval or withdrawel? : the role of honour in anger and shame responses to being insulted

P.M. Rodriguez Mosquera, A.H. Fischer, A.S.R. Manstead, R. Zaalberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

97 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Insults elicit intense emotion. This study tests the hypothesis that one's social image, which is especially salient in honour cultures, influences the way in which one reacts to an insult. Seventy-seven honour-oriented and 72 non-honour oriented participants answered questions about a recent insult episode. Participants experienced both anger and shame in reaction to the insult. However, these emotions resulted in different behaviours. Anger led to verbal attack (i.e., criticising, insulting in return) among all participants. This relationship was explained by participants' motivation to punish the wrongdoer. Shame, on the other hand, was moderated by honour. Shame led to verbal disapproval of the wrongdoers behaviour, but only among the honour-oriented participants. This relationship was explained by these participants' motivation to protect their social image. By contrast, shame led to withdrawal among non-honour-oriented participants.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1471-1498
Number of pages28
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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