Assessing the effect of persuasive robots interactive social cues on users’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance

Aimi Shazwani Ghazali (Corresponding author), Jaap Ham, Emilia Barakova, Panos Markopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Research in the field of social robotics suggests that enhancing social cues in robots can elicit more social responses in users. It is however not clear how users respond socially to persuasive social robots and whether such reactions will be more pronounced when the robots feature more interactive social cues. In the current research, we examine social responses towards persuasive attempts provided by a robot featuring different numbers of interactive social cues. A laboratory experiment assessed participants’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance toward a persuasive robot that either presented users with: no interactive social cues (random head movements and random social praises), low number of interactive social cues (head mimicry), or high number of interactive social cues (head mimicry and proper timing for social praise). Results show that a persuasive robot with the highest number of interactive social cues invoked lower reactance and was liked more than the robots in the other two conditions. Furthermore, results suggest that trusting beliefs towards persuasive robots can be enhanced by utilizing praise as presented by social robots in no interactive social cues and high number of interactive social cues conditions. However, interactive social cues did not contribute to higher compliance.

LanguageEnglish
JournalAdvanced Robotics
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Robots
Compliance
Robotics
Experiments

Keywords

  • Human-Robot interaction (HRI)
  • interactive social cues
  • persuasive robot
  • social responses

Cite this

@article{93e044fc54be48a6a82ec674efb99610,
title = "Assessing the effect of persuasive robots interactive social cues on users’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance",
abstract = "Research in the field of social robotics suggests that enhancing social cues in robots can elicit more social responses in users. It is however not clear how users respond socially to persuasive social robots and whether such reactions will be more pronounced when the robots feature more interactive social cues. In the current research, we examine social responses towards persuasive attempts provided by a robot featuring different numbers of interactive social cues. A laboratory experiment assessed participants’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance toward a persuasive robot that either presented users with: no interactive social cues (random head movements and random social praises), low number of interactive social cues (head mimicry), or high number of interactive social cues (head mimicry and proper timing for social praise). Results show that a persuasive robot with the highest number of interactive social cues invoked lower reactance and was liked more than the robots in the other two conditions. Furthermore, results suggest that trusting beliefs towards persuasive robots can be enhanced by utilizing praise as presented by social robots in no interactive social cues and high number of interactive social cues conditions. However, interactive social cues did not contribute to higher compliance.",
keywords = "Human-Robot interaction (HRI), interactive social cues, persuasive robot, social responses",
author = "Ghazali, {Aimi Shazwani} and Jaap Ham and Emilia Barakova and Panos Markopoulos",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01691864.2019.1589570",
language = "English",
journal = "Advanced Robotics",
issn = "0169-1864",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

Assessing the effect of persuasive robots interactive social cues on users’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance. / Ghazali, Aimi Shazwani (Corresponding author); Ham, Jaap; Barakova, Emilia; Markopoulos, Panos.

In: Advanced Robotics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing the effect of persuasive robots interactive social cues on users’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance

AU - Ghazali,Aimi Shazwani

AU - Ham,Jaap

AU - Barakova,Emilia

AU - Markopoulos,Panos

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Research in the field of social robotics suggests that enhancing social cues in robots can elicit more social responses in users. It is however not clear how users respond socially to persuasive social robots and whether such reactions will be more pronounced when the robots feature more interactive social cues. In the current research, we examine social responses towards persuasive attempts provided by a robot featuring different numbers of interactive social cues. A laboratory experiment assessed participants’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance toward a persuasive robot that either presented users with: no interactive social cues (random head movements and random social praises), low number of interactive social cues (head mimicry), or high number of interactive social cues (head mimicry and proper timing for social praise). Results show that a persuasive robot with the highest number of interactive social cues invoked lower reactance and was liked more than the robots in the other two conditions. Furthermore, results suggest that trusting beliefs towards persuasive robots can be enhanced by utilizing praise as presented by social robots in no interactive social cues and high number of interactive social cues conditions. However, interactive social cues did not contribute to higher compliance.

AB - Research in the field of social robotics suggests that enhancing social cues in robots can elicit more social responses in users. It is however not clear how users respond socially to persuasive social robots and whether such reactions will be more pronounced when the robots feature more interactive social cues. In the current research, we examine social responses towards persuasive attempts provided by a robot featuring different numbers of interactive social cues. A laboratory experiment assessed participants’ psychological reactance, liking, trusting beliefs and compliance toward a persuasive robot that either presented users with: no interactive social cues (random head movements and random social praises), low number of interactive social cues (head mimicry), or high number of interactive social cues (head mimicry and proper timing for social praise). Results show that a persuasive robot with the highest number of interactive social cues invoked lower reactance and was liked more than the robots in the other two conditions. Furthermore, results suggest that trusting beliefs towards persuasive robots can be enhanced by utilizing praise as presented by social robots in no interactive social cues and high number of interactive social cues conditions. However, interactive social cues did not contribute to higher compliance.

KW - Human-Robot interaction (HRI)

KW - interactive social cues

KW - persuasive robot

KW - social responses

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062981943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01691864.2019.1589570

DO - 10.1080/01691864.2019.1589570

M3 - Article

JO - Advanced Robotics

T2 - Advanced Robotics

JF - Advanced Robotics

SN - 0169-1864

ER -