About oligothiophene self-assembly : from aggregation in solution to solid-state nanostructures

Phillipe Leclere, M. Surin, P. Viville, R. Lazzaroni, A.F.M. Kilbinger, O. Henze, W.J. Feast, M. Cavallini, F. Biscarini, A.P.H.J. Schenning, E.W. Meijer

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Abstract

Well-defined -conjugated oligomers play an important role in the field of organic electronics, because their precise chemical structure and conjugation length give rise to well-defined functional properties and facilitate control over their supramolecular organization. In this review, we present different complementary approaches for the control of molecular assembly into well-defined structures on the nanoscale, applied to oligothiophenes as a typical conjugated system. We consider self-assembly in solution, sublimation of individual molecules in the vapor phase, and aggregation in thin deposits from compounds molecularly dispersed in a solution. We demonstrate that the development of substituted, soluble -conjugated materials allows not only a control of their organization in the solid state but also the possibility of determining the degree of order in solution. During these self-assembly processes, the interplay between the conjugated molecules, the solvent, and the substrate surface is of primary importance. Depending on the interactions between the molecules and the substrate, one-dimensional (nanowires) or two-dimensional (platelets) objects can be generated. The self-organization of conjugated building blocks in solution or on surfaces, leading to the construction of nanoscopic and mesoscopic architectures, represents a starting point for the construction of molecular electronics or even circuits, through surface patterning with nanometer-sized objects.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4452-4466
JournalChemistry of Materials
Volume16
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Self assembly
Nanostructures
Agglomeration
Molecules
Molecular electronics
Sublimation
Substrates
Platelets
Oligomers
Nanowires
Electronic equipment
Deposits
Vapors
Networks (circuits)

Cite this

Leclere, Phillipe ; Surin, M. ; Viville, P. ; Lazzaroni, R. ; Kilbinger, A.F.M. ; Henze, O. ; Feast, W.J. ; Cavallini, M. ; Biscarini, F. ; Schenning, A.P.H.J. ; Meijer, E.W. / About oligothiophene self-assembly : from aggregation in solution to solid-state nanostructures. In: Chemistry of Materials. 2004 ; Vol. 16, No. 23. pp. 4452-4466.
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abstract = "Well-defined -conjugated oligomers play an important role in the field of organic electronics, because their precise chemical structure and conjugation length give rise to well-defined functional properties and facilitate control over their supramolecular organization. In this review, we present different complementary approaches for the control of molecular assembly into well-defined structures on the nanoscale, applied to oligothiophenes as a typical conjugated system. We consider self-assembly in solution, sublimation of individual molecules in the vapor phase, and aggregation in thin deposits from compounds molecularly dispersed in a solution. We demonstrate that the development of substituted, soluble -conjugated materials allows not only a control of their organization in the solid state but also the possibility of determining the degree of order in solution. During these self-assembly processes, the interplay between the conjugated molecules, the solvent, and the substrate surface is of primary importance. Depending on the interactions between the molecules and the substrate, one-dimensional (nanowires) or two-dimensional (platelets) objects can be generated. The self-organization of conjugated building blocks in solution or on surfaces, leading to the construction of nanoscopic and mesoscopic architectures, represents a starting point for the construction of molecular electronics or even circuits, through surface patterning with nanometer-sized objects.",
author = "Phillipe Leclere and M. Surin and P. Viville and R. Lazzaroni and A.F.M. Kilbinger and O. Henze and W.J. Feast and M. Cavallini and F. Biscarini and A.P.H.J. Schenning and E.W. Meijer",
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Leclere, P, Surin, M, Viville, P, Lazzaroni, R, Kilbinger, AFM, Henze, O, Feast, WJ, Cavallini, M, Biscarini, F, Schenning, APHJ & Meijer, EW 2004, 'About oligothiophene self-assembly : from aggregation in solution to solid-state nanostructures', Chemistry of Materials, vol. 16, no. 23, pp. 4452-4466. https://doi.org/10.1021/cm049673x

About oligothiophene self-assembly : from aggregation in solution to solid-state nanostructures. / Leclere, Phillipe; Surin, M.; Viville, P.; Lazzaroni, R.; Kilbinger, A.F.M.; Henze, O.; Feast, W.J.; Cavallini, M.; Biscarini, F.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Meijer, E.W.

In: Chemistry of Materials, Vol. 16, No. 23, 2004, p. 4452-4466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Leclere, Phillipe

AU - Surin, M.

AU - Viville, P.

AU - Lazzaroni, R.

AU - Kilbinger, A.F.M.

AU - Henze, O.

AU - Feast, W.J.

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AB - Well-defined -conjugated oligomers play an important role in the field of organic electronics, because their precise chemical structure and conjugation length give rise to well-defined functional properties and facilitate control over their supramolecular organization. In this review, we present different complementary approaches for the control of molecular assembly into well-defined structures on the nanoscale, applied to oligothiophenes as a typical conjugated system. We consider self-assembly in solution, sublimation of individual molecules in the vapor phase, and aggregation in thin deposits from compounds molecularly dispersed in a solution. We demonstrate that the development of substituted, soluble -conjugated materials allows not only a control of their organization in the solid state but also the possibility of determining the degree of order in solution. During these self-assembly processes, the interplay between the conjugated molecules, the solvent, and the substrate surface is of primary importance. Depending on the interactions between the molecules and the substrate, one-dimensional (nanowires) or two-dimensional (platelets) objects can be generated. The self-organization of conjugated building blocks in solution or on surfaces, leading to the construction of nanoscopic and mesoscopic architectures, represents a starting point for the construction of molecular electronics or even circuits, through surface patterning with nanometer-sized objects.

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JO - Chemistry of Materials

JF - Chemistry of Materials

SN - 0897-4756

IS - 23

ER -