A program for Victory Boogie Woogie

Loe M.G. Feijs (Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The paintings of Piet Mondrian have been attractive for programmers and researchers writing programs that produce compositions resembling the originals. In earlier work published in Leonardo, a generic framework was proposed, which turned out flexible and could be adapted to generate many different Mondrian types. Until recently, there were hardly any attempts to target Mondrian's Victory Boogie Woogie, which is more difficult than most of the earlier Mondrian types. This article describes an extension of the Leonardo approach by including Victory Boogie Woogie. This work poses different challenges because of its uniqueness, its complexity and the fact that it is unfinished. In the extension, three principles for modelling and programming are used: (1) working with cells, (2) nesting, and (3) object-orientation. The program entered and won a Dutch national competition on programming Victory Boogie Woogie in 2013.

LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Mathematics and the Arts
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Painting
Programming
Object-orientation
Chemical analysis
Uniqueness
Target
Cell
Modeling
Boogie-Woogie
Piet Mondrian
Victory
Framework

Keywords

  • algorithmic art
  • composite pattern
  • De Stijl
  • generative art
  • Mondrian
  • object-oriented programming
  • Victory Boogie Woogie

Cite this

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A program for Victory Boogie Woogie. / Feijs, Loe M.G. (Corresponding author).

In: Journal of Mathematics and the Arts, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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