A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange

K. Chatzikokolakis, C. Palamidessi

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We propose a probabilistic variant of the pi-calculus as a framework to specify randomized security protocols and their intended properties. In order to express an verify the correctness of the protocols, we develop a probabilistic version of the testing semantics. We then illustrate these concepts on an extended example: the Partial Secret Exchange, a protocol which uses a randomized primitive, the Oblivious Transfer, to achieve fairness of information exchange between two parties.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationTrustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers)
    EditorsR. De Nicola, D. Sangiorgi
    Place of PublicationBerlin
    PublisherSpringer
    Pages146-162
    ISBN (Print)3-540-30007-4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
    Volume3705
    ISSN (Print)0302-9743

    Fingerprint

    Semantics
    Testing

    Cite this

    Chatzikokolakis, K., & Palamidessi, C. (2005). A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange. In R. De Nicola, & D. Sangiorgi (Eds.), Trustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers) (pp. 146-162). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 3705). Berlin: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/11580850_9
    Chatzikokolakis, K. ; Palamidessi, C. / A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange. Trustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers). editor / R. De Nicola ; D. Sangiorgi. Berlin : Springer, 2005. pp. 146-162 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science).
    @inproceedings{6fb73e576d104a4c9b27cc29b2ec8272,
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    abstract = "We propose a probabilistic variant of the pi-calculus as a framework to specify randomized security protocols and their intended properties. In order to express an verify the correctness of the protocols, we develop a probabilistic version of the testing semantics. We then illustrate these concepts on an extended example: the Partial Secret Exchange, a protocol which uses a randomized primitive, the Oblivious Transfer, to achieve fairness of information exchange between two parties.",
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    Chatzikokolakis, K & Palamidessi, C 2005, A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange. in R De Nicola & D Sangiorgi (eds), Trustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 3705, Springer, Berlin, pp. 146-162. https://doi.org/10.1007/11580850_9

    A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange. / Chatzikokolakis, K.; Palamidessi, C.

    Trustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers). ed. / R. De Nicola; D. Sangiorgi. Berlin : Springer, 2005. p. 146-162 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 3705).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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    Chatzikokolakis K, Palamidessi C. A framework for analyzing probabilistic protocols and its application to the partial secrets exchange. In De Nicola R, Sangiorgi D, editors, Trustworthy Global Computing (International Symposium, TGC 2005, Edinburgh, UK, April 7-9, 2005, Revised Selected Papers). Berlin: Springer. 2005. p. 146-162. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). https://doi.org/10.1007/11580850_9