A computational fluid dynamics study on hemodynamics for different locations of the distal anastomosis of a bypass nearby a collateral vessel in the femoropopliteal area

J. Rivera, G.B. van der Graaf, J.R. Escudero, S. Bellmunt, F.N. van de Vosse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revascularization of the femoropopliteal sector is often performed by the placement of a bypass. In this paper, we have studied the effects of hemodynamics on patency of the bypass for different positions of the distal anastomosis close to a collateral artery. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used for this study. The cardiac cycle-averaged wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillation index (OSI) have been analyzed. Low WSS and high OSI may increase the risk of intimal hyperplasia (IH), which may reduce bypass patency. From the CFD simulations, spots of low WSS and high OSI are found within and near the entrance of the collateral artery, near the suture line, at the floor, toe, and heel. We regarded flow ratios of 20:80 and of 35:65. It is found that for the high flow ratio anastomosis located proximal to the collateral artery is clearly more advantageous. However for the low flow ratio anastomosis located distal to the collateral artery seems to be slightly more advantageous, the results are less conclusive. One of the studied flow geometries has been validated by in vitro experiments using a time resolved particle image velocimetry technique. Velocity fields from these experiments are in good agreement with the CFD results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1263-1277
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
  • Hemodynamics
  • Oscillation index (OSI)
  • Particle image velocimetry (PIV)
  • Wall shear stress (WSS)

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