A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity

S. Hofmann, Steven van der Linden, Koen van Gils, S. Iseni, P.J. Bruggeman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The goal of plasma induced healing is to obtain a high bacteria killing rate without significant damage of the healthy cells. For this task various cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ’s) have been developed over the years. In those APPJ’s the plasma is created with an inert gas inside a ceramic or glass tube between two electrodes. The effluent mixes outside with the air-environment. APPJ’s differ usually in electrode geometry (ring, needle), used gas-effluent (helium, argon) and excitation frequency (DC, kHz, MHz). These differences in input parameters are also changing the plasma parameters, such as the gas temperature, UV-emission and production of reactive species, which makes a direct comparison of the plasma jets challenging and contributes to the large discrepancies between biomedical experiments of different groups using (slightly) different plasma jets1. Additionally the plasma is also strongly influenced by the sample which is treated, due to the change in conductivity and capacitance which adds to the complexity. We investigate therefore also the plasmas in contact with saline solutions, which are representative for a wound. In this contribution we use one plasma jet, a plasma needle and operate it with helium and argon with mixtures of air and three different excitation modes, namely nanosecond pulsed DC, kHz pulsed radio-frequency and continuous radiofrequency. We investigate the difference of power dissipation of the plasma and spatial resolved gas temperature for the different conditions. Furthermore we investigate the dependence of these parameters when in contact with metal, ceramic and saline solution. For the pulse excited plasmas nanosecond time resolved images have been obtained to gain more insight on the morphology of those discharges when in contact with a saline solution. Preliminary results on cell and bacteria-treatment with the different plasmas are also discussed. 1. J. Ehlbeck et al., "Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sources for microbial decontamination," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., vol. 44, no. 1, p. 013002, Jan. 2011. ___________________________ * This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPresentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS 2012), July 8-12, 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK - Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Jul 201212 Jul 2012

Conference

Conference39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS 2012), July 8-12, 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Abbreviated titleICOPS 2012
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh, Scotland
Period8/07/1212/07/12

Fingerprint

gas temperature
activity (biology)
plasma jets
atmospheric pressure
dissipation
effluents
helium
argon
ceramics
decontamination
air
healing
cells
needles
rare gases
radio frequencies
direct current
tubes
damage
conductivity

Cite this

Hofmann, S., van der Linden, S., van Gils, K., Iseni, S., & Bruggeman, P. J. (2012). A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity. In Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland
Hofmann, S. ; van der Linden, Steven ; van Gils, Koen ; Iseni, S. ; Bruggeman, P.J. / A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity. Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland. 2012.
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abstract = "The goal of plasma induced healing is to obtain a high bacteria killing rate without significant damage of the healthy cells. For this task various cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ’s) have been developed over the years. In those APPJ’s the plasma is created with an inert gas inside a ceramic or glass tube between two electrodes. The effluent mixes outside with the air-environment. APPJ’s differ usually in electrode geometry (ring, needle), used gas-effluent (helium, argon) and excitation frequency (DC, kHz, MHz). These differences in input parameters are also changing the plasma parameters, such as the gas temperature, UV-emission and production of reactive species, which makes a direct comparison of the plasma jets challenging and contributes to the large discrepancies between biomedical experiments of different groups using (slightly) different plasma jets1. Additionally the plasma is also strongly influenced by the sample which is treated, due to the change in conductivity and capacitance which adds to the complexity. We investigate therefore also the plasmas in contact with saline solutions, which are representative for a wound. In this contribution we use one plasma jet, a plasma needle and operate it with helium and argon with mixtures of air and three different excitation modes, namely nanosecond pulsed DC, kHz pulsed radio-frequency and continuous radiofrequency. We investigate the difference of power dissipation of the plasma and spatial resolved gas temperature for the different conditions. Furthermore we investigate the dependence of these parameters when in contact with metal, ceramic and saline solution. For the pulse excited plasmas nanosecond time resolved images have been obtained to gain more insight on the morphology of those discharges when in contact with a saline solution. Preliminary results on cell and bacteria-treatment with the different plasmas are also discussed. 1. J. Ehlbeck et al., {"}Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sources for microbial decontamination,{"} J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., vol. 44, no. 1, p. 013002, Jan. 2011. ___________________________ * This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research",
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Hofmann, S, van der Linden, S, van Gils, K, Iseni, S & Bruggeman, PJ 2012, A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity. in Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland. 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS 2012), July 8-12, 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom, 8/07/12.

A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity. / Hofmann, S.; van der Linden, Steven; van Gils, Koen; Iseni, S.; Bruggeman, P.J.

Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland. 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Hofmann, S.

AU - van der Linden, Steven

AU - van Gils, Koen

AU - Iseni, S.

AU - Bruggeman, P.J.

PY - 2012

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N2 - The goal of plasma induced healing is to obtain a high bacteria killing rate without significant damage of the healthy cells. For this task various cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ’s) have been developed over the years. In those APPJ’s the plasma is created with an inert gas inside a ceramic or glass tube between two electrodes. The effluent mixes outside with the air-environment. APPJ’s differ usually in electrode geometry (ring, needle), used gas-effluent (helium, argon) and excitation frequency (DC, kHz, MHz). These differences in input parameters are also changing the plasma parameters, such as the gas temperature, UV-emission and production of reactive species, which makes a direct comparison of the plasma jets challenging and contributes to the large discrepancies between biomedical experiments of different groups using (slightly) different plasma jets1. Additionally the plasma is also strongly influenced by the sample which is treated, due to the change in conductivity and capacitance which adds to the complexity. We investigate therefore also the plasmas in contact with saline solutions, which are representative for a wound. In this contribution we use one plasma jet, a plasma needle and operate it with helium and argon with mixtures of air and three different excitation modes, namely nanosecond pulsed DC, kHz pulsed radio-frequency and continuous radiofrequency. We investigate the difference of power dissipation of the plasma and spatial resolved gas temperature for the different conditions. Furthermore we investigate the dependence of these parameters when in contact with metal, ceramic and saline solution. For the pulse excited plasmas nanosecond time resolved images have been obtained to gain more insight on the morphology of those discharges when in contact with a saline solution. Preliminary results on cell and bacteria-treatment with the different plasmas are also discussed. 1. J. Ehlbeck et al., "Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sources for microbial decontamination," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., vol. 44, no. 1, p. 013002, Jan. 2011. ___________________________ * This work is part of the research program of the Foundation for Fundamental Research

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M3 - Conference contribution

BT - Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland

ER -

Hofmann S, van der Linden S, van Gils K, Iseni S, Bruggeman PJ. A comparison of different cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets for biomedical applications : gas temperatures, morphology, power dissipation and biological activity. In Presentation at the 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma (ICOPS 2012), 8-12 July 2012, Edinburgh, Scotland. 2012