A causal model relating urban form with daily travel distance through activity/travel decisions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urban form is often assumed to influence travel distance. However, as this is no travel choice in itself, but the consequence of other decisions, this paper tests, consistent with the activity-based approach, a causal model that does not relate urban form directly with daily travel distance, but indirectly through a series of decisions. A structural equation model was developed with urban form measures for both the residential and the work environment. The model demonstrates that indirect effects can steer a total effect in another direction, indicating that the apparent effects of one variable on another can be the trade-off of opposite effects. Effects from residential density suggest that people in a dense residential environment travel a little less, although this effect is partly cancelled out by extra activities. Workplace density/mix increases total daily distances, but decreases distances by car.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-134
Number of pages20
JournalTransportation Planning and Technology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2009

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travel
Railroad cars
residential density
residential environment
workplace
structural model
work environment
trade-off
effect
decision
automobile

Keywords

  • Activity/travel decisions
  • Daily travel distance
  • Structural equation model
  • Urban form

Cite this

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A causal model relating urban form with daily travel distance through activity/travel decisions. / Maat, Kees; Timmermans, Harry J.P.

In: Transportation Planning and Technology, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.04.2009, p. 115-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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